Snowhow

Loading...
  • Maintenance and use of your tent - 8 tips!
    Outdoor Maintenance and use of your tent - 8 tips!
    Would you like to know more about the maintenance and use of your tent? A tent requires little maintenance, but then it is important that you handle it neatly
  • Buyer's guide: Which tent is right for me?
    Outdoor Buyer's guide: Which tent is right for me?
    Looking for a good tent for your adventure? We tell you what to look out for when choosing a tent
  • Buyer's guide: How to pick the right goggle
    Safety and protection Buyer's guide: How to pick the right goggle
    Looking for the right goggle? In the Snowcountry buyer's guide, you'll find tips to help you find the right goggle for you
  • Adjusting snowboard bindings
    Snowboard Adjusting snowboard bindings
    How you adjust your snowboard bindings depends on what you intend to do and your personal preference. We would like to help you get started and give some tips
  • How to wax your (touring) skis
    Tourski How to wax your (touring) skis
    In this article we tell you how to wax your own skis or touring skis and what you need to do so
  • How to sharpen your (touring) skis
    Ski How to sharpen your (touring) skis
    Are you going to sharpen your (touring) skis yourself? Make sure you have the right equipment at hand: Clean cloth: for removing dirt. Edger: holder for your sharpening stones to sharpen the sides of the ski. File guide: holder for your sharpening stones to sharpen the base of the ski. Oxyd sharpening stone: for removing burrs and damages. Fine sharpening stone: for sharpening. Diamond file: for polishing and repairing small damages and burrs. Grinding rubber: to remove the initial sharpness from the contact points. Water. Stand or holder: to secure your skis. Preparation. While sharpening, you want your skis to be securely held with the steel edge facing up. In our webshop, you'll find a special holder for skis. Of course, you can use something else, as long as the ski is securely fastened. Also, make sure the ski stoppers are not in the way. You can easily do this by pulling the stopper towards the binding with a rubber band. Then use a clean cloth to remove dirt from the steel edge, and you're ready to start sharpening. Step 1: Ensure the correct angles. Create the correct angle for your steel edge with the edger and file guide. Use the edger for the side and the file guide for the base. For the side, the most commonly used angles are 88 or 89 degrees. Note that you use the same angle in all steps. The smaller the angle, the sharper the edge, and the more aggressive the ski. For the base, an angle of half a degree is often used. The final angle has a significant impact on the properties of your ski. Step 2: Check for burrs. Burrs are small protrusions on the steel edge caused by damage during use. Gently run your finger along the edge looking for irregularities; these are
Show per page